Do you have enough money?

Will you ever?

Are you making a living or making a dying?

These questions posed in the first edition of Your Money or Your Life are just as fresh and in your face as ever. Does it need a face lift, though, to stay relevant for another generation? Take the survey to help us know the answer.

In just a year Your Money or Your Life will celebrate her 25th birthday. It’s not just a book anymore. It’s a classic. A phenomenon. Nearly a million copies in about a dozen languages. Many tens of thousands of people changed their lives in small and large ways using the tools. Phrases like “Money is life energy” and “No shame no blame” and “Gazingus Pin” have entered the culture.

A new generation has come of age into an even more complex financial world than the one 25 years ago. Rather than one career young people can look forward to 7 or more different jobs. Without the option of very inexpensive state or local schools, most students graduate with frankly obscene debt loads. A BA was enough in 1990. Now an MA is assumed. We wrote the first draft of the book before word processors! Now digital natives can track data and get answers via their phones. However, there’s a perennial wisdom between the covers of Your Money or Your Life. It asks you to examine your assumptions, face your behavior, dig for your values, wrap your mind around a much bigger picture than your one little life and question the money game itself. It’s not about strategies. It’s about your relationship with money, which isn’t just money and the things money can buy. It’s about the good life.

If you would like to help us understand how Your Money or Your Life, in some form, with adaptations and updates, might serve another generation, please take this survey.

 

 

3 Comments

  • Bobbie Tsukahara Posted April 22, 2016 8:58 am

    Since 2008, when the most recent edition of Your Money or Your Life, there have been huge changes in the economy. What advice do you give these days regarding treasuries and TIPS? I ask because The “full faith and credit” of the US govt doesn’t have quite the meaning it did before the big short and the big bail out. And some members of congress are more likely to allow the govt to default on debt now. Unthinkable prior to 2010. Thanks for your time and for all your good work!

    • Vicki Robin Posted April 22, 2016 10:11 am

      i don’t offer investing advice and yes, full faith and credit of the US government has really changed since Joe invested in treasuries.

  • Kevin Cohan Posted August 13, 2016 5:23 am

    Hi Vicki,

    I hope you are well and enjoying life!

    I’m 62 (63 in October), have no savings, a fair amount of debt ($270k). This includes the debt on my home which has a value of about $325k. I made about $120k last year, but I’m a Realtor so it’s not totally predictable. This year I have made very little, though the clients I’m working with now could turn that around if they make a move in the market. Do you think the book could help me get out of my situation? Fortunately, I am healthy and feel a lot younger than 62! I guess what I’m asking is, with the world changes since 2008, is the content still relevant and applicable? When a guy like Trump has even made it as far as he has, you have to ask yourself if everything is going to hell in a handbasket! Thanks, Kevin

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